PodCamp Boston logo

The PodCamp festivities got going with a bang last night as the good folks from the Berkman Center hosted a reception for us at Harvard Law School.

We have a good rundown of the evening on the PodCamp Boston Blog and includes video from Chris Penn’s welcome and audio from an inspiring talk by Chris Lydon about the very first podcasts — recorded at The Berkman Center — back in 2003. Great stuff.

I spent time with dozens of passionate people, hemophilia therapy including PodCampers who came in from New York, Washington D.C., Pittsburgh, Montreal, and London! I can’t wait for the official start the event … in less than two hours. Gotta skoot!

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I expect to have little — if any — time to blog about PodCamp while it’s talking place.

Fortunately, artificial there should be others that will! Follow the posts here:

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Still letting all the events of PodCamp soak in, page and I plan to offer a more extended post on the event in this space within the next couple of days.

In the meantime, there’s plenty of good PodCamp talk in episode No. 171 of For Immediate Release: The Hobson and Holtz Report.

With Shel Holtz unavailable, Neville was gracious enough to have me on for a chat about PodCamp, the role of new-media/podcast consultants, and memories of September 11, 2001.

There’s also a segment recorded live from PodCamp with Mitch Joel, John Wall, and me.

Here are the show notes:

Content summary: In conversation with Bryan Person: the role of a podcast or new-media consultant, Podcamp Boston, remembering 9/11; CAPOW report from Podcamp Boston; Shel on employee communication; follow-up on the Adam Curry/Joseph Jaffe kerfuffle; listeners’ comments discussion; the music; and more.

Show notes for September 11, 2006

download For Immediate Release podcast

Welcome to For Immediate Release: The Hobson & Holtz Report, an 80-minute podcast recorded live from Amsterdam, The Netherlands; and from Boston, Massachusetts, and Concord, California, USA.

Download the file here (MP3, 37MB), or sign up for the RSS feed to get it and future shows automatically. (For automatic synchronization with your iPod or other digital player, you’ll also need a podcatcher such as Juice, DopplerRadio, iTunes or Yahoo! Podcasts, or an RSS aggregator that supports podcasts such as FeedDemon).

In This Edition:

FIR Show Notes links
Links for the blogs, individuals, companies and organizations we discussed or mentioned in the show are posted to the FIR Show Links pages at The New PR Wiki. You can contribute – see the home page for info.

If you have comments or questions about this show, or suggestions for our future shows, email us at fircomments@gmail.com; or call the Comment Line at +1 206 222 2803 (North America) or +44 20 8133 9844 (Europe); or Skype: fircomments. You can email your comments, questions and suggestions as MP3 file attachments, if you wish (max. 3 minutes / 5Mb attachment, please!). We’ll be happy to see how we can include your audio contribution in a show.

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Still letting all the events of PodCamp soak in, page and I plan to offer a more extended post on the event in this space within the next couple of days.

In the meantime, there’s plenty of good PodCamp talk in episode No. 171 of For Immediate Release: The Hobson and Holtz Report.

With Shel Holtz unavailable, Neville was gracious enough to have me on for a chat about PodCamp, the role of new-media/podcast consultants, and memories of September 11, 2001.

There’s also a segment recorded live from PodCamp with Mitch Joel, John Wall, and me.

Here are the show notes:

Content summary: In conversation with Bryan Person: the role of a podcast or new-media consultant, Podcamp Boston, remembering 9/11; CAPOW report from Podcamp Boston; Shel on employee communication; follow-up on the Adam Curry/Joseph Jaffe kerfuffle; listeners’ comments discussion; the music; and more.

Show notes for September 11, 2006

download For Immediate Release podcast

Welcome to For Immediate Release: The Hobson & Holtz Report, an 80-minute podcast recorded live from Amsterdam, The Netherlands; and from Boston, Massachusetts, and Concord, California, USA.

Download the file here (MP3, 37MB), or sign up for the RSS feed to get it and future shows automatically. (For automatic synchronization with your iPod or other digital player, you’ll also need a podcatcher such as Juice, DopplerRadio, iTunes or Yahoo! Podcasts, or an RSS aggregator that supports podcasts such as FeedDemon).

In This Edition:

FIR Show Notes links
Links for the blogs, individuals, companies and organizations we discussed or mentioned in the show are posted to the FIR Show Links pages at The New PR Wiki. You can contribute – see the home page for info.

If you have comments or questions about this show, or suggestions for our future shows, email us at fircomments@gmail.com; or call the Comment Line at +1 206 222 2803 (North America) or +44 20 8133 9844 (Europe); or Skype: fircomments. You can email your comments, questions and suggestions as MP3 file attachments, if you wish (max. 3 minutes / 5Mb attachment, please!). We’ll be happy to see how we can include your audio contribution in a show.

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Jay and his harmonica

Here’s one of the 60-plus PodCamp Boston photos that I’ve posted to my Flickr account.

It’s Jay Moonah from the Canadian band Uncle Seth during a PodCamp Boston after-hours party last Saturday night. Jay let me have a go with one of his harmonicas a few minutes later … let’s just say I have a lot to learn.

Uncle Seth was one of two podsafe bands/artists (the other: Michelle Cummings) to perform at PodCamp Boston. Check out the group’s full show from last Saturday, cost as well as the highlights and an interview for FeltUp.Tv.

More excerpts from my PodCamp photo set to come.

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Five guys. Five stories.

Here are five guys that helped make this year’s PodCamp Boston a success:

  • Mitch Joel (far left) drove down from Montreal to be part of PodCamp. He and C.C. Chapman (middle) met in person for the very first time on Saturday morning, order and just a few hours later they were presenting a session before a jam-packed audience on building your personal brand (listen to the session audio). Mitch has become a true friend — and mentor — to me over these last two months and having him at PodCamp was one of my personal highlights from the unconference. And C.C.? Everyone seems to know — and like — him, health system and there’s a very good reason for that. His enthusiasm for podcasting and goodwill are infectious.
  • Clinton Alvord (second from left) is the genius behind comedy4cast and was part of the panel discussion that I moderated on podcast formats.
  • Bob Goyetche (fourth from left) from the Rogic podcast congolmerate also made the trek down from Canada, story and he was part of a late-night jam session (Clinton and C.C. were there, too) in Saturday’s after hours that won’t be forgotten anytime soon! Bob is one of the organizers of Podcasters Across Borders, a conference I don’t intend to miss in 2007.
  • Guido Stein (far right) emerged as one of PodCamp’s celebrities. He had the most unique story and self-pitch: He’s a guy; he knits; and he’s damn proud of it. Check out his latest podcast — as well as the comments from some the PodCampers he made an impression on.

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Five stories from PodCamp Boston and five new-media lessons we can take from those stories.

Hosted by Bryan Person. Recorded from Boston, arthritis Massachusetts, discount USA and published for Saturday, September 16, 2006.

Subscribe to the New Comm Road podcast. It’s free, and it ensures you won’t miss a single episode! Find us in the iTunes store or paste this feed into iTunes or your podcatching software of choice: http://feeds.feedburner.com/NewCommRoad

IN TODAY’S SHOW:

  • Podcast ID
  • Voice man Lee Hopkins
  • Requests to leave us audio feedback on our comment line (number below)
  • Five stories from PodCamp Boston 2006 and five new-media lessons that we can take from those stories.
    1. Story No. 1: C.C. Chapman and Mitch Joel met face-to-face for the first time at PodCamp, just hours before making a presentation on “Building Your Personal Brand.” But thanks to the power of social media, the two have already long since gotten to know each other.
      Lesson No. 1: Social media helps us to build strong connections with others, even with those whom we’ve never met in person. The face-to-face meetings help to cement these connections. If you’re a blogger or a podcaster, nourish the online connections you have with your audience, with your customers.
    2. Story No. 2: Guido Stein became a glorified celebrity at PodCamp? Why? Because his story is unique: He’s a guy, he knits, and he’s proud if it.
      Lesson No. 2: Tell your unique story.
    3. Story No. 3: Leesa Barnes gave a presenation called “Plan a Killer Podcast.”
      Lesson No. 3: To keep your podcast going strong and to help it flourish, you have to plan! Know where your podcast is headed and map it out four to six episodes in advance.
    4. Story No. 4: I led a panel discussion on podcast formats. There were different opinions among the panelists on the ideal length of a podcast and how predictable or varied it should be.
      Lesson No. 4: Podcasting is still a very new medium, and we’re figuring out what works and what doesn’t as we go along. There’s still space for you to enter into the conversation<./li>
    5. Story No. 5: We had nearly 350 registrants for PodCamp and some 250-300 total participants. We spent zero dollars on advertising and marketing and organized the event largely through Web 2.0 tools — a wiki and on blogs and podcasts
      Lesson No. 5: Use the powerful Web 2.0 tools to get the word out about your event and to organize it. You don’t always need a big budget to pull off a big event successfully.
  • Note that I will be publishing interviews that I conducted at PodCamp on this website and to the podcast feed over the next week or two.
  • Do you like the New Comm Road podcast? Please tell your friends and colleagues about this show, and direct them to NewCommRoad.com.
  • Announcing the closing music from Uncle Seth, a podsafe band that traveled all the way down from Toronto to perofrm at PodCamp.
  • Show close

* This show can also be found on Blubrry.

MUSIC:

YOUR FEEDBACK:

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LISTEN:

Running time: 21 minutes, 2 seconds.

Direct download this episode, or listen using the player below!
With all of the catching up from PodCamp during the past week (and there’s still some more of that to come), capsule I didn’t even take notice of my 100th post. Coincidentally, ask that post had this title: “Proud of our success.”

If this blog is indeed a success, then you a reader are a big part of the reason. So, congratulations to you! And thank you.

podcamp Boston

It’s been a week since the landmark PodCamp Boston took place at Bunker Hill, healing and I’m still flying high.

The event far surpassed the expectations of even our organizing team. We were hoping for 200 participants. We wound up with some 250-300. We were hoping for two full days of sessions. We wound up with that, order plus a reception hosted by Harvard Law School’s Berkman Center on Friday night and a takeover of a North End Irish Pub for four hours on Saturday night. We had a full range of presentations with dozens of dynamic speakers, disinfection and we had two podsafe bands. New connections, friendships, and partnerships were made. and the passion for podcasting and new media was on display throughout.

These are some of the memories that I’ll take from PodCamp:

* Listening to Chris Lydon. The former Berkman fellow and current host of Open Source made history with Dave Winer back in 2003 by recording the very first podcast. We heard snippets from that conversation during Berkman Center’s reception, and we also heard personally from present-day Chris (listen to the audio presentation). He wrapped up his remarks thusly:

“Let’s go for it. To have the technology that makes it cheap and easy and democratic and global for people to speak in their own voice — this is a tremendous breakthrough, I think. And so I’m just thrilled to be here, to see that I an idea I was there to witness bearing fruit — and just to say, ‘Let’s go for it at the highest’ — this is truly a transformative piece of technology, and it’s not about the tricks. It’s not about the commerce. It’s about people speaking in their own voice. ‘Follow the gleam in your own mind, from within!’”

* Dinner with Mitch Joel. Mitch, who is president of Twist Image and host of the Six Pixels of Separation podcast, is good friend and a digital marketing visionary who drove down from Montreal to be part of PodCamp. After the Berkman reception on Friday, we took some time to chat over a meal in Harvard Square. Mitch is a sought-after speaker in Canada, and he had some excellent advice for me on how to take my podcast and new-media work forward. I’m grateful, Mitch.

* The road-trippers. I was blown away by the number of PodCampers who, like Mitch, made the trip to Boston from way, way out of town. Among those that I spent time with: Leesa Barnes and Uncle Seth from Toronto, Michael Bailey from Kansas City, Tom Morris from London, Vic Podcaster from Silicon Valley, Laura Allen from New York City, Eric Olson from Chicago, MaryHelen Votral from Philadelphia, and Justin Kownacki from Pittsburgh. By my reasoning, they helped make PodCamp a national and international conference!

* The “newbies”. PodCamp was meant to bring together not only the people that are already podcasting, but also those who are just starting to learn about the new-media space. Zakiya Alake, whom I spoke with on Saturday, was one of those curious newcomers. She’s working on a citizen journalism project that will be launched next month in the Boston area, and she came to PodCamp to find out more about podcasting. She has a Swahili first name as well (meaning “intelligent”), which brought a smile to my face. We’ll be naming our son, who’s due to be born one month from today, Amani, which is Swahili for “peace.”

* The sessions. I tried to balance my time at PodCamp between sessions and one-on-one conversations. Two of the best presentations I attended were from Mitch and C.C. Chapman, who spoke about “building your personal brand,” and Leesa, who reminded us of the importance of planning your podcast.

* Cementing the online connections. As much as I enjoy the online connections I’ve made through blogging and podcasting, there is still no substitute for face-to-face interaction. And much like with the “geek dinner” that I attended in New York City in June, PodCamp helped make more of those in-person meetings possible. I had been corresponding with Leesa, Michael, and Ted Demopoulos for a while, but it simply doesn’t get any cooler than sharing a conversation with them over beer or music. Thanks, guys.

* The music. I’m a man with limited musical talents, and my days of playing the piano and trumpet having long sinced passed me by. But that doesn’t mean I didn’t enjoy the performance from Uncle Seth at PodCamp on Saturday afternoon, or the after hours “jamn session” in Room 813 of the Holiday Inn Express later that night. Uncle Seth’s Jay Moonah even gave a me a crack at one of his harmonicas.

* The passion. Remember CQ + PQ > IQ? PodCamp was all about bringing together creative and passionate people and seeing what happens when they work together. The results have been astounding. Check out some of our collective work here, here, and here.

* Budget? We don’t need no stinkin’ budget! PodCamp happened because a couple of guys — Christopher Penn and Chris Brogan — had a vision, and then because scores of others believed in that vision. We used a wiki, a blog, and our participants to spread the word. We raised the money we needed for the event by asking for it … and then asking again.

* The stories. All of the participants had their unique stories. I was privileged to hear some of them. John Havens writes about podcasting, but he also organizes a monthly meetup of fathers called “Pop Culture.” Guido Stein enjoys knitting. Andrea Mercado gets to blog conferences for a library association. Francesca Rheannon interviews writers. Courtney Rau is evangelizing new media in her school district, and Phil Lupsiewicz is doing the same for the Lowell National Historical Park. They are all great podcasters — or they will be very soon.

We’re hoping to hold PodCamp Boston 2 in the late spring or early summer of 2007. I can’t wait.

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