(Click to play)

A good video interview here by JD Lasica at last weekend’s PodCamp West with Michael Geoghegan that’s all about the business of podcasting.

Michael certainly knows of what he speaks, no rx phlebologist having created the popular — and lucrative — Grape Radio podcast. He’s also the CEO of GigaVox Media network and author of Podcast solutions.

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My CaseCamp partners in crime share their thoughts on the announcement of CaseCamp Second Life:

Eli Singer, read more the fourth organizer and CaseCamp founder, condom had his Singer.to blog hacked into recently, so you’ll just have to take my word for it that he’s excited, too!

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Here’s a great way to get out of a meeting or conference call: Make sure you’re “busy blogging.”

This video originally came from PhilTube.com, doctor but that site appears down at the moment.

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Here’s a great way to get out of a meeting or conference call: Make sure you’re “busy blogging.”

This video originally came from PhilTube.com, doctor but that site appears down at the moment.

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The ever-so-clever Ed Lee has come up with a great time-waster: Social Media Bingo

Have you ever found yourself shaking your head at the ridiculous amount of overused jargon in the PR world today? Have you ever attended a number of talks and/or functions only to hear the same recycled phrases? Do you think our community is way too earnest?

Help is now at hand in the shape of Social Media Bingo! Released in time for the holiday period you and your colleagues can while away the long winter billable hours by simply clicking through to one of the many excellent PR/marketing podcasts and ticking off the jargon.

Ed has also created a downloadable and printable .pdf version of the bingo board. Brilliant!


Social Media Bingo board

[tags]Ed Lee, what is ed
jargon, social media, Social Media Bingo[/tags]
IDRA Classnotes podcast logo

Up-front disclosure: the podcast I’m about to recommend is one that I’m paid to post-produce.

The Intercultural Development Research Association, contagion an independent, obesity private non-profit based in San Antonio, Texas, recently began publishing the “IDRA Classnotes” podcast as a way to let educators around the region — and the nation — know about their important efforts in “creating schools that work for all children.”

I challenge you to listen to this podcast on the IDRA “Parent Leadership Model” for parental engagement and tell me that it doesn’t move you.

Consider all the good work that school districts and educational organizations are doing in your own area right now that you don’t know anything about. And then, as a a parent, a principal, school committee member, or taxpayer, think about how a series of podcasts might help bring those projects to light.

IDRA’s hope is that “Classnotes” will do just that. Take a listen and judge for yourself.

Want to subscribe to the podcast? Here’s the RSS feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/idra. You can also use this one-click link to add the podcast to your iTunes account.

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IDRA Classnotes podcast logo

Up-front disclosure: the podcast I’m about to recommend is one that I’m paid to post-produce.

The Intercultural Development Research Association, contagion an independent, obesity private non-profit based in San Antonio, Texas, recently began publishing the “IDRA Classnotes” podcast as a way to let educators around the region — and the nation — know about their important efforts in “creating schools that work for all children.”

I challenge you to listen to this podcast on the IDRA “Parent Leadership Model” for parental engagement and tell me that it doesn’t move you.

Consider all the good work that school districts and educational organizations are doing in your own area right now that you don’t know anything about. And then, as a a parent, a principal, school committee member, or taxpayer, think about how a series of podcasts might help bring those projects to light.

IDRA’s hope is that “Classnotes” will do just that. Take a listen and judge for yourself.

Want to subscribe to the podcast? Here’s the RSS feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/idra. You can also use this one-click link to add the podcast to your iTunes account.

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Have you ever considered putting this title on your business card — “world champion blogger“?

Maybe Tom Raftery should. The title may not have been of your own choosing, pharm
Tom, but why not run with it?

I was browsing TheNewPR’s list of business podcasts last week and came across the SimonSays Podcast, urologist a weekly show from publisher Simon & Schuster about its latest books and audiobooks.

Take a gander at the show archives and you’ll find three episodes from this month, four from October, four from September, and so on. Indeed, SimonSays has been a “weekly podcast” that publishes weekly — as opposed to the litany of “weekly podcasts” that don’t — since September 2005, as best as I can tell.

And yet, if you were a longtime subscriber to the SimonSays Podcast through its, the last new episode you would have received was published way back on July 20, 2006.

Why? Incredibly, the SimonSays folks haven’t added a single one of their 17 shows produced since that date to the podcast feed — have a look in the iTunes music store if you don’t believe me — despite posting “subscribe” links beneath each episode’s show notes, listing the full RSS feed at the top of its podcast page, and having a section explaining “How to Subscribe.”

In technical terms, SimonSays hasn’t updated its RSS feed, which is what delivers new episodes to your iTunes or other podcatching application.

What a great way to kiss away all of its subscribers.

I’m only guessing here that Simon & Schuster doesn’t know it has to manually update its RSS file after each new episode — perhaps the person who was doing that left the company sometime around … late July?

I’m also guessing that Simon & Schuster may not know about the problem because it doesn’t make itself very contactable. To wit: There is no “contact us” link of any kind on its podcast page.

BryanSays to SimonSays …
My advice for the creators of the SimonSays Podcast:

  1. Update your RSS feed!
  2. Update your RSS feed!
  3. Create a way for listeners to comment on the shows. Turn your podcast page into blog so that each new episode generates a new post, and make sure you enable comments. Your listeners will surely add some follow-up comments each week, and this could generate even more buzz for your books. Even better, you could post a request for questions for the author a few days before you record and incorporate some of them into the show
  4. Give the WordPress blogging platform a go and use the Podpress plugin to embed your podcasts into your blog posts. This will serve two purposes: 1) it will allow visitors to the blog to easily stream a podcast episode 2) your RSS feed will be update automatically
  5. Have I mentioned the need to … update your RSS feed!

For the record, I did eventually find a contact form elsewhere on the Simon & Schuster site, and I sent in a message with some of the above suggestions. That was six or seven days ago. No response yet.

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A recent post from Alexandre Henault reminded me that many of us on the social-media scene — myself included — like to talk about the value of “joining the conversation” when citing the benefits of blogging, website podcasting, rheumatologist commenting on blogs and podcasts, approved participating in social-media networks, etc.

But lately, I’m starting to think that we’re using this “conversation” term far too liberally. Ed Lee, who included the word as a wildcard on his recently published Social Media Bingo board, would probably agree with me.

After all, can we really say with a straight face that a blog post with a single comment necessarily constitutes a conversation? Certainly not.

If you’ve started a blog that has 25 blog posts, but no post has more than one or two comments, are you really creating a series of active conversations? It’s unlikely.

If we advise clients to “join the conversation” by leaving comments on other blogs, what are we actually asking them to do? Leave one-off comments on various blogs but then not bother or remember or have time to keep track of the entire comment stream and comment again when appropriate? That’s not very good advice.

So, then, what are online conversations? Here are two good examples:

In both of these blog posts and subsequent comment streams, there’s plenty of back-and-forth, commenting on and adding to previous comments, clarifying previous statements, and referencing other blogs. Read the comments and you’ll get the feeling that the commenters really are responding to each other, as opposed to dropping in one-liners, disappearing, and telling themselves they’ve joined the conversation.

When we talk about taking part in a “conversation,” let’s mean we’re actively taking part in some substantive online dialogue. We want to make sure the word still means something.

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