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David Jones (left), Ed Lee and I meeting up on the Friday afternoon before PodCamp Toronto.

It’s taken a few days, but I have emerged from the depths of what Bob Goyetche calls “post-PodCamp letdown mode.” Time to look back.

Last weekend’s visit to Toronto for PodCamp Toronto was, quite simply, outstanding. Plenty of teaching, sharing, and learning, just like PodCamp Boston. I caught up with old friends, like Jay Moonah — in fact, we also led a presentation together on Second Life — Mitch Joel, Christopher Penn, Chris Brogan, John Wall, Leesa Barnes, Michael Bailey, Mark Blevis, and Bob Goyetche; met face-to-face for the very first time with so many others that I had gotten to know online in the past several months, including Terry Fallis, Donna Papacosta, Michael Seaton, Luke Armour, Chris Clarke, Michelle Tampoya, David Jones, and Ed Lee; and met several new people with whom I look forward to sharing the social media space in the months and years to come, like Eden Spodek, Vergel Evans, Sulemaan Ahmed, and Sonya Buyting.

Here are my most top takeaways from the event:

  • From Mitch Joel’s presentation on personal branding: Your “elevator pitch” gives you 30 seconds to start a meaningful relationship.
  • From Julien’s Smith talk on podcasting and search engine optimization (SEO): Google doesn’t care about audio; it cares about text. If your podcast isn’t housed on a blog, you’re killing your chances of ranking highly in Google’s search results.
  • From several of Christopher Penn’s presentations: 1) the new-media tools for marketing your podcast and building your audience are absolutely at your fingertips 2) Don’t ignore MySpace.
  • There is good money to be made as a consultant/speaker/trainer if you know how to teach new media to business.
  • It’s not all about the money. We didn’t travel to Toronto from Boston, Cleveland, Montreal, Ottawa, and Philadelphia just to make a quick buck. We believed in the power of connecting with our community and in finding others to join us.
  • The staff members at the Rogers Communications Centre at Ryerson University were truly a collection of all-stars. Thanks to their efforts, we had a live video stream of every session. All of the presentations have also been archived on the PodCamp wiki.
  • Toronto-area students were very much part of the event. Three that I met were Omar Ha-Redeye, from Gary Schlee’s Corporate Communications and PR program at Centennial College; Cathy Kurzbock, who is preparing a seminar on social media for her classmates at Seneca College; and Nicholas Montgomery, a 12-year-old who is getting ready to start his own podcast.
  • Never underestimate the “social” in social media. The crowd from PodCamp Toronto knew how to party. We don’t all live in our mothers’ basements.

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Here are the relevant links for my presentation with Jay Moonah at PodCamp Toronto last weekends.

“It Isn’t Just a Video Game: Second Life for Events”

* Quicktime Video
* mp3 audio
* Presentation slides (PDF)
* Presentation notes (PDF)

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I popped into Boston this morning — and more specifically, erectile into the Sweet Finnish in Jamaica Plain — for the monthly meetup of the Boston Media Makers, dosage who are led by the ubiquitous Steve Garfield.

It took more than two hours to go ’round the table, so that the 30 of us could introduce ourselves and talk about our current and future projects. I especially enjoyed learning from people that I either didn’t know well or had never met at all, and was reminded yet again that the Boston area is oozing with new-media talent.

Here are a few of my takeaways:

* To record a screencast, Steve Albanese from TutorialDEPOT advises using Snapz on a Mac and Camtasia version 3.1.2 on the PC.

Beth Kanter

* Beth Kanter (above) is one fascinating woman. She blogs on educational technology, social change, and the Khmer culture, among other topics. Give her flagship blog, Beth’s Blog, a look-see.

* Adam Weiss, one of my fellow co-organizers of PodCamp Boston last fall, has set up and produced a series of podcasts for Forrester Research. The podcasts don’t appear in a search on Forrester’s site yet, but presumably, they will soon.

Ashley Hodson

* Ashley Hodson (above, right) has just completed one heckuva road trip. She and Megan McLaughlin logged 14,000 miles since last summer exploring some of this nation’s sustainability projects. The pair’s journey is chronicled through text and video at Sustainable Route.

* A second free daily newspaper, joining the Metro, is coming to Boston. Regina O’Brien spoke about BostonNOW, a paper launching later this year both online and in print. The paper will feature a mix of wire stories and contributions from citizen journalists, including local bloggers, photographers, and artists. Sound intriguing? Visit the BostonNOW blog for more information, including details on an upcoming public meeting.

I’ve posted more photos from the meetup on my Flickr stream.

Steve Garfield offers the notes from the meeting as well.

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still image from video by Beth Kanter

Beth Kanter, allergy for whom I offered worthy praise in my post about key learnings from the Boston Media Makers’ March 4 meetup, buy more about has produced a short video about whether production values matter in videoblogging.

The video is based on a presentation from David Tames that took place at the end of the meetup, and includes some of my Flickr photos.

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I was just on the phone with Chris Brogan, visit who was checking to make sure that my silence here the past several days didn’t mean that I had abandoned the Bryper.com blogging ship.

Rest assured: I haven’t.

I’ve just been 1) swamped in the day job at MONSTER, to the point that I haven’t had the mental energy to craft a thoughtful post 2) Twittering way, way too much.

Twitter, in case you’ve somehow missed it, is the micro-blogging/IM/SMS platform that has simply gone bananas in popularity in the last week to 10 days. (You can also see my previous post and podcast about Twitter). The number of Twitter blog posts last weekend was absolutely staggering — nearly to the point of being nauseating, in fact.

I’m certainly not alone in saying that my excessive Twitter postings — some of them witty, I hope; others pointing to interesting links I’ve found; and still others obviously nonsensical — have corresponded with a drop in my more formal blogging.

I’ll be working harder (smarter?) at finding the right balance — keeping up with the fast-paced world of Twitter postings, but still bringing you plenty of good material here.

But … should I quiet on you again for a while, you can always take a peek at Twitter posts. I’ve also added a direct link there from the top navigation bar on the blog.

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