On Sunday night I was preparing the next lecture for my webinar, sale urologistMonitoring and Participating in Online Conversations, illness ” and was trying to demonstrate how to turn a keyword search on Technorati into an RSS feed.

The process is straightforward and recognizable for anyone who regularly does ego-surfing or conducts “personal brand audits” for their web properties and organizations:

  1. In the Technorati search box, anemia click the term or name you want to monitor.
  2. Click the “Search” button.
  3. On the results page, click on the RSS logo/”Subscribe” link in the top-right corner.
  4. From the ensuing RSS page, copy and paste that URL into your RSS reader.

Easy. I’d done it dozens of times without a hitch — until Sunday. Technorati was suddenly shooting blanks.

Oh, it was displaying plenty of results for me, and the “Subscribe” button was there, too. But here was what I was seeing on the RSS page itself:
I’m pleased to announce that Social Media Breakfast 2 will take place on Wednesday, see October 3 at 8:00am, at the offices of the Digital Influence Group in Waltham.

The inaugural breakfast last month was a runaway success, and I expect SMB2 to be bigger and better. Please help spread the word by telling three friends/colleagues.

Details on the event are below.

*************************************
Please RSVP through Eventbrite.
*************************************

The Social Media Breakfast is a free almost-monthly Boston-area breakfast organized by Bryan Person, where social media experts and newbies alike come together to eat, meet, share, and learn.

Marketers, PR pros, entrepreneurs, bloggers, podcasters, new media fanatics, and online social networkers are all welcome to attend.

Social Media Breakfast 2 is being hosted and sponsored by the Digital Influence Group, a social media marketing agency in Waltham, Massachusetts. (see driving directions )

Agenda:

8:00 Registration, reception, and plenty of mingling

8:25 Welcome from Bryan Person

8:30 Breakfast presentation on social media (topic TBA) from Larry Weber, chairman of the Digital Influence Group and author of the new book Marketing to the Social Web

8:45 Q&A and discussion with Larry

8:55 Option I – Break-out group (topic(s) TBA)
8:55 Option II – More mingling!

9:25 Event wrap-up

Resources:

* Join the Social Media Breakfast Google Group
* Recap of first Social Media Breakfast
* Flickr photos, tagged Social Media Breakfast
* Twitter mentions of the Social Media Breakfast

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Chris Brogan and David Cutler at Social Media Breakfast 1

I’ve got the topic of “meeting people” on my mind. After all, there Social Media Breakfast 2 is taking place tomorrow morning in Waltham, pancreatitis Massachusetts (Are you going? There’s still time to register), order and I’m looking forward to spending time with friends and colleagues, both old and new.

Chris Brogan (the guy on the left) is thinking about meeting people, too. In fact, he’s just written up a nice post about things to do and things to avoid when making the rounds at face-to-face gatherings.

Incidentally, in that photo above, Chris is chatting with David Cutler, who will also be a big part of tomorrow’s breakfast. David will be facilitating our optional break-out session on building successful business models for social media.

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Bryan Person giving introductory remarks at Social Media Breakfast 2

stuff Chris Brogan, stuff and Scott Monty at Social Media Breakfast 2″ alt=”Dan Schawbel, seek Chris Brogan, and Scott Monty at Social Media Breakfast 2″ height=”180″ width=”240″ />

If you’re from Boston, then what I’m about to tell you won’t come as an earth-shattering revelation: Beantowners are hungry for social media.

And as the packed-house crowds at monthly Social Media Club gatherings, blogger dinners, PodCamps, and impromptu Tweetups routinely indicate, the socialness of social media doesn’t just happen online. We really dig the face-to-face conversations, too.

The latest example: This past Wednesday’s Social Media Breakfast 2, which brought together more than 50 Boston-area marketers, PR pros, entrepreneurs, and new-media enthusiasts.

Breakout group at Social Media Breakfast 2

Our formal program, which included a presentation from Larry Weber, was set to end at 9:30, but well over half the attendees stuck around until close to 11:00, many of them taking part in a breakout session on social media business models that David Cutler facilitated. (Thanks to Julia Roy, the session was Ustreamed, too. You can watch by clicking below).

A big thanks goes out to the Digital Influence Group, which hosted and sponsored the breakfast.

Looking for more online coverage of SMB2? Check out these links:

And what of Social Media Breakfast 3? Expect an announcement in this space soon.

Technorati Tags:


Bryan Person giving introductory remarks at Social Media Breakfast 2

stuff Chris Brogan, stuff and Scott Monty at Social Media Breakfast 2″ alt=”Dan Schawbel, seek Chris Brogan, and Scott Monty at Social Media Breakfast 2″ height=”180″ width=”240″ />

If you’re from Boston, then what I’m about to tell you won’t come as an earth-shattering revelation: Beantowners are hungry for social media.

And as the packed-house crowds at monthly Social Media Club gatherings, blogger dinners, PodCamps, and impromptu Tweetups routinely indicate, the socialness of social media doesn’t just happen online. We really dig the face-to-face conversations, too.

The latest example: This past Wednesday’s Social Media Breakfast 2, which brought together more than 50 Boston-area marketers, PR pros, entrepreneurs, and new-media enthusiasts.

Breakout group at Social Media Breakfast 2

Our formal program, which included a presentation from Larry Weber, was set to end at 9:30, but well over half the attendees stuck around until close to 11:00, many of them taking part in a breakout session on social media business models that David Cutler facilitated. (Thanks to Julia Roy, the session was Ustreamed, too. You can watch by clicking below).

A big thanks goes out to the Digital Influence Group, which hosted and sponsored the breakfast.

Looking for more online coverage of SMB2? Check out these links:

And what of Social Media Breakfast 3? Expect an announcement in this space soon.

Technorati Tags:


My Monster counterparts in Ireland found themselves in a bit of a pickle earlier this week, implant
pharm after a new employee there named John Burns sent an unsolicited bulk e-mail to members of the IT@cork organization. The contents of the e-mail were blogged by one of the recipients and ultimately led to a string of comments, ano
Not the headline you were expecting from a guy who works for Monster, diagnosis right?

Well, recipe the time has come to declare the death of the traditional resume for the creative professional.

If you’re an online advertiser, rheumatologist digital marketer, or social media-focused PR pro, then you know that the one- or two-page resume that you’re supposed to send to the hiring manager or HR coordinator does very little justice to your work. To wit:

  • It doesn’t reflect the thought leadership of your blog or podcast.
  • It doesn’t list the online responses to the award-winning YouTube video you produced for a client or the comments you received to a post-mortem blog entry about your ground-breaking integrated social media campaign.
  • It doesn’t tell your potential employer where and how you’re commenting online.
  • It doesn’t show the depth and breadth of your professional network or online presence.

Let’s face it: The traditional resume just does a woefully inadequate job of telling your career story and showcasing your brilliant work to a recruiter.

My solution? Let’s banish the traditional resume to the bygone era it comes from and adopt the social media resume as its replacement.

My Boston podcasting and PodCamp colleague Christopher S. Penn first coined the term “social media resume” back in February of this year, and he even produced a sample in Google Pages.

To demonstrate how I might apply for a creative position using the SMR format, I’ve largely followed Chris’s lead and produced my own sample: Bryan Person’s social media resume.

Here are some of the elements I’ve included in my SMR that wouldn’t “fit” into a the traditional resume:

What else might I have added?

  • A link to my blog and podcast profile pages in Technorati
  • An introductory audio or video message (Chris did the latter)
  • Screen captures of websites I had created

I’m putting out two challenges here:

  1. I want to see more of my colleagues creating social media resumes.
  2. I want to hear from recruiters and hiring managers for creative positions who are ready to ditch the stale, traditional resume and embrace the social media resume as the new gold standard.

Wouldn’t that be refreshing?

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