On Sunday night I was preparing the next lecture for my webinar, sale urologistMonitoring and Participating in Online Conversations, illness ” and was trying to demonstrate how to turn a keyword search on Technorati into an RSS feed.

The process is straightforward and recognizable for anyone who regularly does ego-surfing or conducts “personal brand audits” for their web properties and organizations:

  1. In the Technorati search box, anemia click the term or name you want to monitor.
  2. Click the “Search” button.
  3. On the results page, click on the RSS logo/”Subscribe” link in the top-right corner.
  4. From the ensuing RSS page, copy and paste that URL into your RSS reader.

Easy. I’d done it dozens of times without a hitch — until Sunday. Technorati was suddenly shooting blanks.

Oh, it was displaying plenty of results for me, and the “Subscribe” button was there, too. But here was what I was seeing on the RSS page itself:
I’m pleased to announce that Social Media Breakfast 2 will take place on Wednesday, see October 3 at 8:00am, at the offices of the Digital Influence Group in Waltham.

The inaugural breakfast last month was a runaway success, and I expect SMB2 to be bigger and better. Please help spread the word by telling three friends/colleagues.

Details on the event are below.

*************************************
Please RSVP through Eventbrite.
*************************************

The Social Media Breakfast is a free almost-monthly Boston-area breakfast organized by Bryan Person, where social media experts and newbies alike come together to eat, meet, share, and learn.

Marketers, PR pros, entrepreneurs, bloggers, podcasters, new media fanatics, and online social networkers are all welcome to attend.

Social Media Breakfast 2 is being hosted and sponsored by the Digital Influence Group, a social media marketing agency in Waltham, Massachusetts. (see driving directions )

Agenda:

8:00 Registration, reception, and plenty of mingling

8:25 Welcome from Bryan Person

8:30 Breakfast presentation on social media (topic TBA) from Larry Weber, chairman of the Digital Influence Group and author of the new book Marketing to the Social Web

8:45 Q&A and discussion with Larry

8:55 Option I – Break-out group (topic(s) TBA)
8:55 Option II – More mingling!

9:25 Event wrap-up

Resources:

* Join the Social Media Breakfast Google Group
* Recap of first Social Media Breakfast
* Flickr photos, tagged Social Media Breakfast
* Twitter mentions of the Social Media Breakfast

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Chris Brogan and David Cutler at Social Media Breakfast 1

I’ve got the topic of “meeting people” on my mind. After all, there Social Media Breakfast 2 is taking place tomorrow morning in Waltham, pancreatitis Massachusetts (Are you going? There’s still time to register), order and I’m looking forward to spending time with friends and colleagues, both old and new.

Chris Brogan (the guy on the left) is thinking about meeting people, too. In fact, he’s just written up a nice post about things to do and things to avoid when making the rounds at face-to-face gatherings.

Incidentally, in that photo above, Chris is chatting with David Cutler, who will also be a big part of tomorrow’s breakfast. David will be facilitating our optional break-out session on building successful business models for social media.

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Bryan Person giving introductory remarks at Social Media Breakfast 2

stuff Chris Brogan, stuff and Scott Monty at Social Media Breakfast 2″ alt=”Dan Schawbel, seek Chris Brogan, and Scott Monty at Social Media Breakfast 2″ height=”180″ width=”240″ />

If you’re from Boston, then what I’m about to tell you won’t come as an earth-shattering revelation: Beantowners are hungry for social media.

And as the packed-house crowds at monthly Social Media Club gatherings, blogger dinners, PodCamps, and impromptu Tweetups routinely indicate, the socialness of social media doesn’t just happen online. We really dig the face-to-face conversations, too.

The latest example: This past Wednesday’s Social Media Breakfast 2, which brought together more than 50 Boston-area marketers, PR pros, entrepreneurs, and new-media enthusiasts.

Breakout group at Social Media Breakfast 2

Our formal program, which included a presentation from Larry Weber, was set to end at 9:30, but well over half the attendees stuck around until close to 11:00, many of them taking part in a breakout session on social media business models that David Cutler facilitated. (Thanks to Julia Roy, the session was Ustreamed, too. You can watch by clicking below).

A big thanks goes out to the Digital Influence Group, which hosted and sponsored the breakfast.

Looking for more online coverage of SMB2? Check out these links:

And what of Social Media Breakfast 3? Expect an announcement in this space soon.

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Bryan Person giving introductory remarks at Social Media Breakfast 2

stuff Chris Brogan, stuff and Scott Monty at Social Media Breakfast 2″ alt=”Dan Schawbel, seek Chris Brogan, and Scott Monty at Social Media Breakfast 2″ height=”180″ width=”240″ />

If you’re from Boston, then what I’m about to tell you won’t come as an earth-shattering revelation: Beantowners are hungry for social media.

And as the packed-house crowds at monthly Social Media Club gatherings, blogger dinners, PodCamps, and impromptu Tweetups routinely indicate, the socialness of social media doesn’t just happen online. We really dig the face-to-face conversations, too.

The latest example: This past Wednesday’s Social Media Breakfast 2, which brought together more than 50 Boston-area marketers, PR pros, entrepreneurs, and new-media enthusiasts.

Breakout group at Social Media Breakfast 2

Our formal program, which included a presentation from Larry Weber, was set to end at 9:30, but well over half the attendees stuck around until close to 11:00, many of them taking part in a breakout session on social media business models that David Cutler facilitated. (Thanks to Julia Roy, the session was Ustreamed, too. You can watch by clicking below).

A big thanks goes out to the Digital Influence Group, which hosted and sponsored the breakfast.

Looking for more online coverage of SMB2? Check out these links:

And what of Social Media Breakfast 3? Expect an announcement in this space soon.

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My Monster counterparts in Ireland found themselves in a bit of a pickle earlier this week, implant
pharm after a new employee there named John Burns sent an unsolicited bulk e-mail to members of the IT@cork organization. The contents of the e-mail were blogged by one of the recipients and ultimately led to a string of comments, ano
Not the headline you were expecting from a guy who works for Monster, diagnosis right?

Well, recipe the time has come to declare the death of the traditional resume for the creative professional.

If you’re an online advertiser, rheumatologist digital marketer, or social media-focused PR pro, then you know that the one- or two-page resume that you’re supposed to send to the hiring manager or HR coordinator does very little justice to your work. To wit:

  • It doesn’t reflect the thought leadership of your blog or podcast.
  • It doesn’t list the online responses to the award-winning YouTube video you produced for a client or the comments you received to a post-mortem blog entry about your ground-breaking integrated social media campaign.
  • It doesn’t tell your potential employer where and how you’re commenting online.
  • It doesn’t show the depth and breadth of your professional network or online presence.

Let’s face it: The traditional resume just does a woefully inadequate job of telling your career story and showcasing your brilliant work to a recruiter.

My solution? Let’s banish the traditional resume to the bygone era it comes from and adopt the social media resume as its replacement.

My Boston podcasting and PodCamp colleague Christopher S. Penn first coined the term “social media resume” back in February of this year, and he even produced a sample in Google Pages.

To demonstrate how I might apply for a creative position using the SMR format, I’ve largely followed Chris’s lead and produced my own sample: Bryan Person’s social media resume.

Here are some of the elements I’ve included in my SMR that wouldn’t “fit” into a the traditional resume:

What else might I have added?

  • A link to my blog and podcast profile pages in Technorati
  • An introductory audio or video message (Chris did the latter)
  • Screen captures of websites I had created

I’m putting out two challenges here:

  1. I want to see more of my colleagues creating social media resumes.
  2. I want to hear from recruiters and hiring managers for creative positions who are ready to ditch the stale, traditional resume and embrace the social media resume as the new gold standard.

Wouldn’t that be refreshing?

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I belong to 28 Facebook groups — and I don’t actively participate in any of them.

Here are the two main reasons why:

  1. Lack of compelling content. The initial flood of posts to a new Facebook group typically drops off to a trickle after couple of weeks. Essentially, malady a bunch of people rush to join a group, link say hello, impotent and then disappear.
  2. No RSS. Even when there are new posts to a group’s wall or discussion board, I can’t monitor them through an RSS feed. I have no way of knowing what, if anything, is being said in a particular group without manually checking its page from inside of Facebook. To be honest, that’s just too much trouble. (I admit: RSS has spoiled me.)

And I’m not just throwing stones from a glass house here. I acknowledge that I haven’t done much to keep my own Facebook group — the New Comm Road Travelers — active and thriving.

But you tell me: Is my experience with Facebook much different from yours? Is there a magical component I’m somehow overlooking? If I put a little more effort into my Facebook group, would the collective membership suddenly be moved to do more than make a sporadic posting?

I’m hoping you’ll share a success story or two to erase my doubts. I want to hear about a Facebook group you lead, participate in, or know about that is working well.

Either drop a note in the comments section below, or shoot me an e-mail to bperson – AT – gmail – COT com.

[Facebook groups]
In just a couple of hours I’ll be phoning up a PR agency on the West Coast and could very well be saying yes to a pitch that found its way into our Monster e-mail inboxes earlier this week.

And here’s the thing: The pitch wasn’t very good.

For starters, store we are addressed as “Hi Corporate” — you can’t get much sloppier than that. (I can hear Scott Monty telling me now, “Don’t read another word!”)

Next, the PR pro — who works at an agency that sponsored PodCamp Boston last year and should know better — makes zero effort to personalize her message. No mention of what we do at Monster. No attempt to find a match between the event she’s pitching and our career advice site or the Monster Blog, neither of which she bothered to research.

Finally, no links of any kind for me to check out her client’s event and associated product online.

Clearly, a disastrous pitch and one I should be forwarding to Kevin Dugan at the Bad Pitch Blog, right?

And yet, what we’re being pitched is intriguing. It’s funny. It’s a perfect fit for our blog, and potentially for our discussion forums as well. I simply wouldn’t be doing my job if ignored the message.

This post isn’t meant to justify lazy, brainless pitches. There are still best practices that should be followed, and I’ve written and podcasted about them in the past. But occasionally, someone can go about pitching all wrong and still win us over. It happens.

So to answer my own headline question: No, I’m not selling out. I’m being practical.

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Bryper's Social Media Top 10

It’s been a while, link but the Social Media Top 10 finally returns from its autumn hiatus this week.

Week 5 – Friday, page October 12, see 2007

1. Google buys Jaiku
But if the members of my online community all hang on Twitter, does it matter? It might, especially if Twitter “can’t get its act together” soon.

2. Social media news release
Verizon FiOS and Ford this week, HupSpot last week.

3. Amanda Chapel/Strumpette “calls it quits”
Robert French also reveals what he calls Chapel’s “ugly” backstory.

4. Social media case studies
Kami Huyse and Geoff Livingson put out the call, and the responses keep coming in.

5. Social media resume
I’m ready to kill off the traditional resume for the creative fields — and I’m not alone.

6. PodCamp Boston 2
The flagship PodCamp returns in just two weeks. Have you registered?

7. The death of PR
Tom Foremski says the “PR industry … is on borrowed time.”

8. Electric Sheep announces custom viewer for Second Life
I might not classify Second Life as social media, but discussions about it are.

9. RSS coming to Facebook groups?
Ning offers RSS feeds for group messages. Time to do the same, Facebook.

10. Conference Ustreaming
How along until until we’ll see live video streams from all conferences?

What did I miss?

Although I’ve been silent with my SMT10 lists the past few weeks, Doug Haslam has been having some fun with his weekly off-the-wall Social Media Top 5 offerings. Thanks for filling the void, Doug.

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Logo for Social Media Breakfast 3
Get a headstart on PodCamp Boston 2 this Saturday morning by joining us for a very informal Social Media Breakfast 3, medicine starting at 7:30 at the Starbucks Cafe at the Westin Waterfront Boston Hotel, attached to the Boston Convention and Expo Center (BCEC).

Here are the details:

  • Event: Social Media Breakfast 3
  • Date: Saturday, October 27, 2007
  • Time: 7:30 – 8:30am
  • Location: Starbucks Cafe at the Westin Boston Waterfront Hotel, 425 Summer St., Boston, MA 02210
  • Public transportation: Take the Red Line to South Station. Transfer to the Silver Line and follow it to the World Trade Center stop.
  • Cost: Free — until the sponsorship funds are exhausted (probably just after 8:00). Then, it’s pay your own way.
  • What happens afterward: You head up the escalator to the BCEC and sign in for PodCamp Boston 2. You have registered, right?

Social Media Breakfast 3 is sponsored by CM Access (disclosure: the company is both my former employer and a former client).

CM Access logo

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In the leadup to PodCamp Boston 2, help I will be speaking with Laura Fitton on BlogTalkRadio at 4:00pm 10:00am Eastern tomorrow all about “delivering killer presentations.”Laura is the principal of Pistachio Consulting and blogs at Great Presentations Mean Business. If you’re presenting at PodCamp this weekend or just have questions about how to become a better speaker, find join us for the conversation tomorrowHere are the details:

Laura Fitton
Photo from C.C. Chapman’s Flickr photostream

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Here’s the audio from my 58-minute conversation with Laura Fitton earlier today on BlogTalkRadio.

Laura was my guest on a show about “delivering killer presentations at PodCamp” and offered excellent advice for both first-time presenters and accomplished speakers alike. She also took several call-in questions from a listening audience that ranged between 15 and 18 for a solid hour.

Enjoy — and see you at PodCamp Boston 2 this weekend.

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read more Paull Young, orthopedist Bryan Person” alt=”Scott Monty, medstore Paull Young, Bryan Person” height=”180″ width=”240″ />
PodCamp Boston 2 gets underway in a matter of hours with a pre-conference party at Tequila Rain and then continues all the way through Sunday afterrnoon. It promises to be a weekend full of teaching, learning, sharing about new media, as well as catching up with old friends and making new connections.

Here’s how you can find and follow me over the next three days:

Friday night:
* I’ll be joining in the Tequila Rain festivities from 7:00-10:00pm.

* At 9:00, I’ll be hosting a live BlogTalkRadio show with the organizers of PodCamp Perth (Australia), direct from Tequila Rain (or just outside it). Listen here: PodCamp Boston/PodCamp Perth kickoff.

Saturday morning:
* I’ll be meeting and greeting you at Social Media Breakfast 3 from 7:30-8:30am, from the Starbucks Cafe at the Westin Boston Waterfront Hotel, adjacent to the Boston Convention and Expo Center (BCEC). No RSVP is required. Just join us!

Saturday afternoon:
* Join Doug Haslam and me for our PodCamp presentation: “Following and Joining Online Conversations,” from 4:00-5:00pm in Room 203

Saturday night:
* From 7:00-9:00, find me at the Boston Seaport Hotel for the official PodCamp Boston party.
* After the party, I’ll be headed somewhere with other PodCampers to watch Game 3 of the World Series (the Red Sox are only two wins away from the title!).

The rest of the time:
* I’ll be bouncing around the unconference proper at the Boston Convention and Expo Center (BCEC) –  taking part in sessions, making media, and joining in interesting conversations wherever I can.

Follow my Tweets and audio Twittergrams:
* I’ll be Twittering my thoughts and inspirations from PodCamp (and the World Series) all weekend long. My messages are here: Bryper’s Twitter messages.
* Also, your direct Twitter messages will reach my phone.

Call me:
* The BCEC is a big place, and we could be 1,000 people strong. If you can’t find me, just call: +1 (781) 413-5846

Which guy am I?
In the photo above, I’m the goofy guy on the right. Look for me to be wearing an organizer’s T-shirt, too. But if you want to say hello to the other two guys in that picture, you can do that. Both Scott Monty and Paull Young are coming to PodCamp as well.

Hope to see you this weekend!

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Thanks to Twitter, salve following the Red Sox along their march to a second World Series title in four seasons has been an absolute thrill.

So, side effects a tip of the cap to Sarah Wurrey, visit this site Kyle Flaherty, Jack Hodgson, Doug Haslam, Red Sox Cast (would sure like to know his/her real identity), Joe Cascio, Todd Defren, Rod Begbie, and Aaron Brazell for their entertaining, informative, and enthusiastic Red Sox Twitter posts. Seeing their unwavering passion for the Local 9 — particularly over the last couple of months — actually helped charge me up even more.

Enjoy this musical and photographic montage from Boston.com:

The celebratory parade — or “rolling rally” as our mumbling mayor likes to call it — takes place tomorrow, and vaunted Sox closer Jonathan Papelbon has promised to dance once again.Congratulations, Boston Red Sox. You’ve captured the hearts of a Nation once again.

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Thanks to Twitter, salve following the Red Sox along their march to a second World Series title in four seasons has been an absolute thrill.

So, side effects a tip of the cap to Sarah Wurrey, visit this site Kyle Flaherty, Jack Hodgson, Doug Haslam, Red Sox Cast (would sure like to know his/her real identity), Joe Cascio, Todd Defren, Rod Begbie, and Aaron Brazell for their entertaining, informative, and enthusiastic Red Sox Twitter posts. Seeing their unwavering passion for the Local 9 — particularly over the last couple of months — actually helped charge me up even more.

Enjoy this musical and photographic montage from Boston.com:

The celebratory parade — or “rolling rally” as our mumbling mayor likes to call it — takes place tomorrow, and vaunted Sox closer Jonathan Papelbon has promised to dance once again.Congratulations, Boston Red Sox. You’ve captured the hearts of a Nation once again.

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Here is my first Utter, sent from the VON conference in Boston.

Mobile post sent by Bryper using Utterz Replies.  mp3
Geoff Livingston GeoffLiving Hope everyone is OK in CA.
ScottJ scottyj yet another debrief with @dolsen
Dan York danyork FB: Dan is making one last stop for the night…. the VON party. http://tinyurl.com/2n3ekb

Earlier this week I Twittered that my father had returned home after a year-long, meningitis military stint in Kosovo.

Well, more about the folks at ooVoo were obviously paying attention, because yesterday they let me know that they had donated 500 web cameras and microphones to U.S. Air Force personnel, making it easier for soldiers to have video chats with their families during their tours of duty.

I don’t know how we would have kept in touch with my father for the last 12 months were it not for VOIP technology. We mostly stuck to voice chat (my father would call us using Yahoo! Voice Out for just a penny or two a minute), but it isn’t hard to forget one of the few times we added video to the mix.

Video chat with my father on Christmas Day 2006

It was on Christmas Day, and our house was packed with visitors who wanted to share the occasion with my young son Amani, who was just 9 weeks old at the time (hard to believe he’s just turned 1!). We rigged a setup using my sister’s Mac (web cam but no support for Yahoo! Voice) and our landline phone, while my father borrowed a web cam from one of his colleagues on the military base.

As we chatted, I held Amani on my lap, so that my father could get his first live look at his grandson. Each of my relatives then took a turn saying hello, including uncles, aunts, and cousins that shouted from the back of the room. It was loud and hectic, but also gave us all a meaningful and emotional holiday connection with my dad … all things considering.

It can be a lonely life for servicemen abroad, especially for guys like my father, who didn’t even venture off the military base more than a handful of times during his 12-month stay in Kosovo. And while video chat certainly can’t replace in-person interaction (which I’m thrilled and relieved we can now resume with my father on a regular basis, since he lives just a few miles from our house), it certainly can liven up the communications possibilities for soldiers away from home.

So, good on ooVoo for its donation. You can bet those 500 web cams will make for plenty of smiles — and tears — this holiday season.

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I was strolling through the trade-show floor at Fall VON last week when I happened upon one company touting the following:

[Company X]’s standardization leadership and innovative solutions empower the quad-play development community with future proof solutions.

Yuck.

I suddenly had the urge to ask the company’s booth rep, buy more about “Sorry, about it what the [bleep] is it that you actually do?” (I didn’t — I decided to be polite.)

I can’t stand marketing gobbledygook like this, thumb in large part because it doesn’t really tell me anything about the business, product, or service.

And yet, this language fills not only trade-show floors, but corporate websites, press releases, and print brochures as well — meaning it that actually still works at some level.

I know you most of you don’t like bloated corporate-speak, either. So why are we still using it?

A few weeks ago, after noting I had given a colleague some good-natured ribbing over her use of the word “bandwith,” I posed the following question to my Twitter pals:

OK, folks, I’m taking all your confessions and gripes on corporate-speak today. Which words/expressions really make you squirm?

Here are the responses:

Kevin Dugan prblog @bryper – out of the box, strategize, blue sky, 30K foot view, FREE PR

Allan Jenkins allanjenkins @Bryper I noted that if we were looking for a cutting edge place, it wasn’t a level playing field. Kait Swanson kaitswanson @Bryper: Off the grid. I hate off the grid!

Lynette Radio LynetteRadio @Bryper how about “overtime without pay, and at the very last minute…and under unrealistic circumstances?” that would do it for me < ..

Sandy Kalik skalik @bryper bandwidth and interface

 Todd Van Hoosear vanhoosear @bryper I’m mad @ myself for not having the guts to say no 2 clients who still want to write a traditional crappy obfuscated press release.

steverhode steverhode @bryper “Rightsizing”

Christopher Penn cspenn @bryper: with so many people being thought leaders and strategists, no one’s doing any damn WORK.

Joe Cascio joec0914 @Bryper Adjectives morphed into nouns. e.g., “Financials”.

Mignon Fogarty GrammarGirl @Bryper My listeners have complained about the words incentivize and impact (to mean affect) and using dialogue and liaise as verbs.

Christopher Penn cspenn @bryper: synergy, leverage, strategic, vision, cross-function, take it to the next level, data-driven, decisioning, leading, THOUGHT LEADER.

Michael Allison michaelallison @Bryper I don’t particularly like “ducks in a row.” I’ve heard it numerous times in relation to political campaigns.

Joshua Melvin masterots @bryper: “offers us a pivotal gateway of connectivity”

Clay Newton tastybit @Bryper it’s not really biz-speak, but I can’t stand when executives say “excedra”.

BL whatsnext @bryper- take ownership, pursuant to, granular, critical path, disintermediate, paradigm shift, on deck, buy-in, incent, pre-meeting :>)

Lynette Radio LynetteRadio @Bryper “realignment / bandwidth / synergy / status meeting” basically any phrase that comes from middle-mgt brainless drones

Joshua Melvin masterots @bryper: “Value-add”

☺Chris Hambly audio @bryper I FKN hate “synergy” especially when fingers of both hands are clasped together when said.. grrrrr

Allan Jenkins allanjenkins @Bryper Once had a guy ask “That’s a stretch target for me. Is there low hanging fruit closer?” We were deciding where to meet for lunch.

Now if you’ll excuse me, it’s breakfast time, — I’m off to use my innovative, world-class, solution-oriented … toaster.
Yes, check I know it’s been two weeks since PodCamp Boston 2 and you’ve probably already moved onto your next project or conference, but hey: Consider this post part of the PodCamp Boston long tail.

Here are a handful of my takeaways from the event.

PodCamp isn’t just about podcasting.
If you’ve attended a PodCamp or two yourself since the first installment of the unconference back in September 2006, then I’m not telling you anything you don’t already know. Though a number of sessions at the event typically do cover podcasting topics (how to start a podcast, how to try and monetize it, advanced production values, etc.), there are countless others that don’t. Discussions on social networking, social media marketing, storytelling, delivering good presentations, digital identity, and exploring the latest Web 2.0 tools are very much a part of PodCamp, too.

PodCamp is billed as the “new-media unconference” these days, which makes me wonder: Might PodCamp need a new name?

There’s plenty of value outside the sessions.

Anna Farmery and Heather Gorringe at PodCamp Boston 2

Most conferences or unconferences go like this for me: I attend a handful of formal sessions in “education mode” — and then spend the rest of the time hanging out in the hallways speaking with friends and colleagues old and new. PodCamp Boston 2 was no exception.

I won’t soon forget my conversations with Scott Monty, who is the first fellow social-media guy I met because of Twitter and is also quite adept at selecting good Irish pubs that will properly feed a dozen geeks; Anna Farmery and Heather Gorringe, who were visiting from the UK; Paull Young, Constantin Basturea, and Christin Eubanks from Converseon; Mark Blevis, who’s throwing a PodCamp of his own in Ottawa later this month; Mika Pyyhkala and Deb Block-Schwenk, my lunchmates on Saturday; Mitch Joel, Beth Kanter; Kathryn Jones; and fellow Red Sox fans Sarah Wurrey, Doug Haslam, and Joe Cascio, with whom I took in part of Game 3 of the World Series from one of the local dives on Saturday night.

David Maister is one funny dude.

David Maister at PodCamp Boston 2

He’s also known as one of the best in the world in consulting and writing about management of professional services firms — and he’s a blogger and a podcaster. David’s insights during a session on Sunday morning were, quite simply, sensational. I especially liked this line:

Shut up talking about you. You don’t get any of my business by talking about you.”

Managing your online reputation can be tricky business.
There was plenty of good discussion around who you are and how you’re perceived online in a “Job Search 2.0″ discussion led by MaryHelen Votral and Ben Gregg and “Digital Natives” of CM Access (full disclosure: a former employer and former client) and a session on “digital natives” from Michael Denton and the aforementioned Paull Young and Christin Eubanks.

The key question: How much of your personal self should you reveal online and how does all of your blogging, podcasting, social networking, etc. play to job recruiters?

You can here my take as part of a conversation Paull had with Anna Farmery and me in a live-from-PodCamp episode of the Forward Podcast.

PodCamps won’t always be free.
I won’t pretend that I did nearly as much work in helping to organize this year’s PodCamp Boston as I did for the inaugural event (funny what having a baby does to your free time), but there certainly were several other hard-working people who did. Collectively — and in some cases individually — the social media enthusiasts that PodCamp co-founder Christopher Penn names volunteered hundreds of hours of their time to put on a free conference for more than 1,300 registered attendees. One not-so-small detail: Only about 650 of them — not even half — actually made it to PodCamp.

A reasonable no-show rate for free events is to be expected, but when a conference becomes as big as PodCamp Boston has, the result is too much wasted hard work by the organizers to accommodate hundreds of would-be attendees who ultimately decide they have somewhere else to be.

With that in mind, I have no objection to Chris and his fellow co-founder Chris Brogan giving PodCamp organizers the option to charge a nominal registration fee for future unconferences. The result should be a more manageable attendee list and a more accurate representation of just how many participants to plan for.

PodCampers like to party.

Laura Fitton and Joe Cascio at PodCamp Boston 2

’nuff said.

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The Best Laid Plans makes its way to Melbourne
A quick note about a nice gesture from one PR podcaster to another.

Jon Hoel, shop co-host of the PR Junction podcast, this site snapped this photo at the famous Flinders Street Station in his hometown of Melbourne, purchase Australia. He includes the book cover of The Best Laid Plans, the new satirical novel of Canadian politics by Toronto’s Terry Fallis, co-host of the Inside PR podcast, in the shot.

Jon is asking other fans of Terry’s book — and I count myself as one of those, having listened to the entire novel as a podcast earlier this year — to post their own photos of the book next to an appropriate landmark in their city or town.

I ordered my copy of the print version of The Best Laid Plans from Amazon.com Saturday afternoon. Once I have the book in hand, I’ll be following Jon’s lead.

And if you’re in the Toronto area, why not attend the official book launch on Monday, November 19, from 5:30-8:00pm at the Dora Keogh Pub at 141 Danforth Ave? Beer, a book, and conversation with Terry? Sounds like a great away to spend an evening. And don’t forget to ask him about his plans for the sequel.

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Multimedia conference blogging.

Hosted by Bryan Person. Recorded from Boston, patient Massachusetts, pharm USA and published for Tuesday, melanoma November 13, 2007.

LISTEN

Running time: 17:36

iTunes logoSubscribe to the New Comm Road podcast. It’s free, and it ensures you won’t miss a single episode! Click on the iTunes image above, or paste this feed into iTunes or your podcatching software of choice: http://feeds.feedburner.com/NewCommRoad

SOCIAL MEDIA MINUTE

NEW COMM ROAD MAP

* Inspired by a comment and question from Jay Berkowitz, host of the 10 Golden Rules Internet Podcast.

* Good examples of multimedia conference blogs:

Road Map for creating a multimedia conference blog

* Centralized model.

1. Identify your goals for the conference blog. Make them as measurable as you can.

2. Work with an existing blog of the organization.

3. Start getting out the word early through other marketing channels — e-mail newsletter, conference mailing, etc. Be sure to display the URL for the blog prominently in your print material, on your website, and in your e-mail signature.

4. Get content up before the conference itself — with blog posts about things to do in the host city during the conference, hotel deals, podcast interviews with presenters and keynote speakers (Check out Donna Papacosta’s PodcastYourConference.com. )

5. Get the right team together.

6. Use your conference blog as the “hub” but also incorporate other multimedia elements:

  • Twitter feed/Twittergram
  • Flickr photos
  • del.icio.us items
  • Video YouTube/Blip.tv
  • Live video from uStream?
  • Social media news release
  • Audio (use podPress plugin on a WordPress blog)
  • Facebook group or Facebook page
  • Conference/unconference wiki

7. Give out suggested tags (for blogs, Flickr, etc.) that attendees can use when publishing their own content about the conference. Create RSS feeds for these tags and monitor them before, during, and after the conference. During the event, sprinkle in a couple of posts on your main blog that point to content on other blogs and sites.

8. If you blog platform allows it, make good use of categories (”videos” for all videos, ” hotels” for all hotel information, etc.).

9. Use a blog platform that allows multiple authors to post.

10. Make your RSS feeds easy to find your blog and easy to subscribe to.

11. Measurement. Use something like Google Analytics to measure visitors to the blog, incoming links, search terms, etc. Also, find a way to measure engagement — such as with user comments.

12. Evaluate how well you met your original goals.

NOTES

  • This show can also be found on Blubrry.
  • Original New Comm Road theme music created by Nikolay Simov.

CONTACT US

  • Leave your text and audio comments below this post
  • Send us audio files or text e-mails to comments-AT-NewCommRoad.com
  • Call us on our comment line: (206) 222-9130

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How to find, ailment follow, buy join, and create conversations online.

Hosted by Bryan Person. Recorded from Boston, Massachusetts, USA and published for Tuesday, November 6, 2007.

LISTEN

Running time: 26:03

iTunes logoSubscribe to the New Comm Road podcast. It’s free, and it ensures you won’t miss a single episode! Click on the iTunes image above, or paste this feed into iTunes or your podcatching software of choice: http://feeds.feedburner.com/NewCommRoad

NEWS

  • New theme music for New Comm Road from Nikolay Simov in Germany.

SOCIAL MEDIA SUGGESTION

NEW COMM ROAD MAP

The Conversation Continuum: Finding, following, joining, and creating conversations online.

A summary of a presentation I gave with Doug Haslam (from Topaz Partners, PRobecast, the Tech PR Gems blog, and Gischeleman’s Blog) at PodCamp Boston 2, held October 26-28, 2007.

I., II. Finding and following conversations

  1. Search on Google Blog Search
  2. Search on Technorati
  3. Use an RSS reader such as Google Reader
  4. Start subscribing and listening to podcasts through iTunes
  5. Subscribe to Google Alerts
  6. Reading blog comments
  7. Jump onto Twitter and establish a presence in Facebook

III. Joining the conversations

  1. Adding comments to blogs and podcasts
  2. Knowing when to respond to comments and when to stay silent
  3. Reaching out in a human voice
  4. Add to the conversation
  5. Building up your network of friends and followers in your online social networks
  6. Become a part of the community

IV. Starting new conversations (blogger relations/outreach)

  1. Personalize your pitches
  2. Think about the best place to reach those content creators? E-mail? Twitter? Facebook? Blog comment section?
  3. Keep your pitches short
  4. Write in a conversational tone — no corporate-speak!
  5. Understand that bloggers aren’t journalists and have different motivations for publishing
  6. Make sure you’re offering something of real value to the blogger and community.
  7. Offer your content in multiple formats — links of video, audio, Flickr photos, page of del.icio.us links, etc.

COMMENTS

  • Nikolay Simov, the creator of the new music theme for New Comm Road, wants to know if you “have something that you’d like to say to everyone, everywhere?” If you do, e-mail your message in audio format (no longer than 30 seconds) to nik-DOT-simov-AT-gmail-DOT-com
  • Christopher Penn talks about Google Gears.
  • Marko Kulik reminds me that I didn’t include a link to the list of Google Reader shortcuts in the show notes of the last episode. Here’s that link now: Google Reader shortcuts.

RELATED NCR EPISODES

NOTES

  • This show can also be found on Blubrry.
  • New Comm Road theme music created by Nikolay Simov.

CONTACT US

  • Leave your text and audio comments below this post
  • Send us audio files or text e-mails to comments-AT-NewCommRoad.com
  • Call us on our comment line: (206) 222-9130

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The paper copy of The Best Laid Plans, website written by fellow PR podcaster Terry Fallis, drug arrived in my mailbox a few days ago. So as promised in a previous blog post, viagra dosage I ventured into Boston to grab a few shots of the book as part of Jon Hoel’s “photo challenge.”

The idea was to capture a few pictures of the book near landmarks in our own cities. Here’s one of TBLP in the Boston Public Garden:

The Best Laid Plans in the Back Bay

I had a little fun with the challenge, of course. Click on the badge below to see all of the photos.

www.flickr.com

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